“Silent Campine” – Steffen Geypens

Silent Campine is a 15 minutes drama written and directed by Steffen Geypens and was selected for the Flemish Competition: Fiction at the International Short Film Festival in Leuven.  This short film is his 3rd selection for the Film Festival after Buitenspel (2002) and Zien (2003). As a former historic, Geypens was always fascinated by the American westerns from the 50s, this interest strongly influenced Silent Campine, which can be called a modern spaghetti-western.

Silent Campine

The story goes as follows. A traumatised soldier called Albert (Jurgen Delnaet) and his son Juul (Brecht Dael) go hunting every day in order to survive. They also take care for the sick mother. Every day is a struggle, until there is no way back. Geypens wanted to show a troubled father-son relationship. Albert is very authoritarian and there is a quiet tension between them and the other characters in the film. This tension is visualised by gazes and expressions, and enforced by the dialogues.

It is very remarkable that there are no women in the film. You can only hear the sick mother in the backroom, which emphasises the absence of a mother figure and how it affects the son’s upbringing.

The entire film is shot from Juul’s perspective and how he perceives the men surrounding him as well as how he feels towards his own father. He gets confronted with an inner conflict: will he follow his father’s example or will he push himself off from his authoritarian behaviour?

Silent Campine2
By Kris Dewitte
Silent Campine refers to the western genre and more specifically to the film Once upon a Time in the West by Sergio Leone (1968) with the phenomenal Henry Fonda. The references are both on the narrative level as visually. This for example in the well thought-out use of colours, namely the dominance of yellow and brown as well as in the slow shots of the open nature or in the quick montage of the fight scenes.
Another important element in Silent Campine is the soundtrack by Bert Dockx (Dans Dans, Flying Horseman), which captures the atmosphere of the film perfectly. Furthermore, the entire film is really silent, like the title already explains.
To conclude, Silent Campine is an outright clever short film. Steffen Geypens took every single detail into consideration and this is what makes the film so fascinating. I guess that cinephiles who know the western genre and recognise the   elements will love this one even more.

 

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